Superfund 101: Joe Griffin and Stormwater Ponds

Superfund 101: Joe Griffin and Stormwater Ponds

Stormwater is the biggest issue facing the Butte Priority Soils Operable Unit. Copper running off The Hill during spring melt and storm events contaminates water downstream of Butte, and even in low quantities can threaten aquatic life. Before these contaminates reach the restored Silver Bow Creek, they for the most part run into the historic channel running from Texas Avenue to the slag wall canyon near I-90. According to Joe, vegetated stormwater retention ponds in this area would greatly reduce the copper that enters the creek.

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Superfund 101: Joe Griffin and the Sub Drain

Superfund 101: Joe Griffin and the Sub Drain

Joe Griffin returns to the KBMF studio to talk about contamination sources near Silver Bow Creek and the processes with which they are currently dealt with. The sub drain underneath the historic creek channel from Texas Avenue to the slag wall canyon has been the subject of much scrutiny, but Joe says the question is not if the drain is working, but is it working well enough?

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Superfund 101: Pat Cunneen and the Parrot Tailings

Superfund 101: Pat Cunneen and the Parrot Tailings

Pat Cunneen, environmental scientist for the Butte Natural Resource Damage Restoration Council, dives deep into the Parrot Tailings in this two part series for Superfund 101. In Part 1, we talk about the history of the site from a smelter in the late 1800’s, to it’s present day use as baseball field and home to the Butte Silver Bow county shops. In Part 2, Pat explains why the tailings need to go and the plan for removal.

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Superfund 101 with Fritz Daly

Superfund 101 with Fritz Daly

Fritz Daly has been in the thick of Butte’s environmental issues for the last 40 years. Many credit his unrelenting watchfulness with changing how the community interacts with policy makers and responsible parties. In this episode of Superfund 101, Fritz lays out why paying attention to how Butte has been treated in the past will have an effect on the quality of cleanup we recieve in the future.

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Superfund 101 with Robert Pal

Superfund 101 with Robert Pal

Dr. Robert Pal is the Director of Restoration at Montana Tech in the Chemistry and Biology department. Originally from Hungary, Dr. Pal has an extensive background in ecology, biology, botany and phytosociology (the study of plant communities). Since coming to Butte, Robert has worked closely with the BNRC and Butte-Silver Bow County to develop restoration plans and seed mixtures in what he calls the "novel landscape" here on the Butte hill.

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Superfund 101 with Mark Thompson

Superfund 101 with Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson is Montana Resources' Vice President of Environmental Affairs. In this episode he discusses current mining operations in the Continental Pit and how Montana Resources and BP/ARCO interact with Superfund operations in the the Butte Mine Flooding Operable Unit. Mark also walks us through an outline of the proposed pumping and treating of contaminated water from the Berkeley Pit and the Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond.

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Superfund 101 with Joe Griffin

Superfund 101 with Joe Griffin

Joe griffin is a retired hydro-geologist and member of Citizens Technical Environmental Committee (CTEC). Since retiring from the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Joe has worked to monitor and chart data concerning contaminants in Silver Bow and Blacktail Creeks. Joe's work is primarily concerned with the water data from Butte Area 1, or upper Silver Bow Creek and the alluvial aquifer near the soon to be removed Parrot Tailings.

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Superfund 101 with Chad Okrusch

Chad Okrusch is a professor of Professional and Technical Communications at Montana Tech. While at the University of Oregon for his doctorate, Chad wrote his dissertation on the Superfund decision making process with an emphasis on moral pragmatism. In this episode, Chad talks about the Butte, Montana he grew up in, how it has changed as a result of the superfund process and the duty we have as citizens in the remediation and restoration of hard used places.

You can read Dr. Okrusch's dissertation here.

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